Don’t Just Sit There: Transitioning to a Standing and Dynamic Workstation for Whole-Body Health

Don’t Just Sit There: Transitioning to a Standing and Dynamic Workstation for Whole-Body Health

Katy Bowman Size: 205 x 140 mm
Black & White Pages: 160
ISBN: 978 1 905367 65 8 Paperback

£12.99

Don’t Just Sit There explains why swapping one static position for another isn’t taking a big enough look at the problem, and provides corrective exercise and lifestyle solutions to help you safely and effectively transition away from the conventional office set-up.

Katy Bowman

Katy Bowman has
earned an international reputation for educating the general population
on alignment and load-science. Katy is the founder and director of the Restorative Exercise Institute in the US. Katy’s groundbreaking work in pelvic floor restoration has made her particularly popular with midwives and therapists alike.

1 review for Don’t Just Sit There: Transitioning to a Standing and Dynamic Workstation for Whole-Body Health

  1. :

    Katy Bowman’s previous publication, “Move Your DNA” absolutely fascinated me. The whole concept was pretty mind-blowing, and I am starting to put what I’ve learnt into practice. So it was with great intrigue that I read Don’t Just Sit There, a book dedicated to “transitioning to a standing and dynamic workstation for whole-body health”.

    On the cover, that’s what it looks like you are getting, but the reality is there is much more content contained within. I learnt that standing all day is not really any better for you than sitting all day, we’re designed to move! I’ve been reminded of how to both sit and stand well, something that prior to reading I hadn’t given much thought to for years! There are also some small exercises intended for performing at your desk, as well as some for practising regularly in an office environment.

    Being a yogi who practises 3-4 times a week, I realise just how much your body can change from small movements performed regularly. Whilst it may seem strange to take time out from your day-to-day work to perform small movements, it certainly makes a difference. I’ve noticed that my calves have loosened. I believe I messed my calves up through years of wearing heels and sitting at a desk (both at school and then work) and one diagram in Katy Bowman’s book sums this up perfectly; “ladies, your high heeled shoes cast your ankle at a toe point, which has a shortening effect on your calves but when this is coupled with a seated position which casts your knee at 90 degrees, your calves are shortened even further!” I now only wear high heels on special occasions (and often even then I don’t bother!), but will wear the occasional low heel or wedge to work.

    Have I transitioned to a dynamic workstation? Not yet. I am currently scouting out the best apparatus for me to buy/create this kind of work environment. I’d ideally like to create the same setup for my staff as well, and as the official devices are on the pricey side, I’m trying to get creative with my DIY skills!

    Am I more conscious of my movements in the office? Yes most definitely. I now make a marked effort to get up and walk around every 20-30 minutes. Sometimes I position my laptop on a unit and stand so as to vary my position in the office, and when talking on the phone I’ve taken to standing up. It’s amazing how much more assertive and powerful you feel when standing up! It also helps to get the blood flowing, which oxygenates and delivers nutrients to your brain and can help you to feel sharper!

    This book contains useful information for anyone who spends a considerable amount of time at a desk, is health conscious and wants to improve their posture and overall wellbeing. There’s only so much that exercise can do, and if you’re putting all your energy into your workouts, you should complement your efforts by being more aware of your body and alignment in your workplace.

    Rebecca Goodyear
    Chief Blogger
    http://www.biteablebeauty.com